for the love of nike

of sculptures and buildings

I got to go on quick tour of Downtown Denver a few weeks ago. The city is littered with art and interesting architecture–which I love! Here are some of my findings. (Keep your eyes open for similarities I photographed between some of the structures and my mesh sneakers.)

Dancers
is a steel and fiberglass statue by Jonathan Borofsky. The couple stands outside of the Denver Performing Arts Complex. It was created in an effort to demonstrate, “everything is connected and all is one.” Take a look at more of Borofsky’s work hereDowntown Denver / for the love of nikeDowntown Denver / for the love of nikeDowntown Denver / for the love of nikeThe red steel sculpture below is by Mark di Suvero named after ancient Chinese philosopher, Lao-Tzu. It’s located in Acoma Plaza between the North Building and Denver Public Library. It was constructed to suggest a union of opposites, of forms and voids–much like the Taoist yin-yang theory. See more of Mark di Suvero’s work hereDowntown Denver / for the love of nike

This 35 foot tall broom and dustpan was created by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje Van Bruggen. The Big Sweep is located on Martin Plaza outside the Hamilton Building. I love everyday objects that disrupt our typical conception of scale. See more of this duo’s pieces here.
Downtown Denver / for the love of nikeDennis Oppenheim’s Light Chamber is fashioned after the unfolded petals of a flower. As you can guess by the name, it is illuminated at night. It’s right outside The Denver Office of Cultural Affairs. This piece also plays on the metaphorical flow of the mental process as a mind makes its way through the decision-making process, alluding to the inner workings of the court system. See more of Oppenheim’s work hereDowntown Denver / for the love of nikeDowntown Denver / for the love of nikeDowntown Denver / for the love of nikeThis insane structure is the North Building of the Denver Art Museum. Italian architect Gio Ponti and Denver-based James Sudler Associates dreamt it up. It’s covered in glass tiles and the skinniest windows you ever did see. Find out more about Ponti hereDowntown Denver / for the love of nikeThe conglomeration of buildings below is the Denver Public Library. This postmodern construction was built in 1995 and designed by Michael Graves. Postmodernity is known for its wit, ornament, and reference. Take a closer look at his wide range of work hereDowntown Denver / for the love of nikeDowntown Denver / for the love of nikeWell, what do you think? Which pieces do you love and which ones do you hate?

16 comments

  1. The next time you’re in town check some of our late 19th and early 20th century architecture such as the bank lobby at 821 17th St., The Broker Restaurant bank vaults below that lobby at the same address (they’ll give you a little tour) and the Brown Palace Hotel. Also the interior of the State Capitol Building. There are many many more too.

  2. Pingback: Follow Your Folly | for the love of nike

  3. Pingback: ¡adiós, 2015! | for the love of nike

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: